Heathy Casa

Stay updated with news, ideals and new technology for your health!

Category: News

Health in the news

Do Teething Babies Need Medicine on Their Gums? No

Español
 Subscribe: FDA Consumer Health Information
Teething is a normal part of childhood and should not be treated with homeopathic remedies, like teething tablets, or prescription or over-the-counter (OTC) medications that are rubbed on the gums.
Benzocaine—a local anesthetic—is the active ingredient in several OTC oral health care products such as Anbesol, Baby Orajel, Cepacol, Chloraseptic, Hurricaine, Orabase, Orajel, & Topex. These products are not useful for treating sore gums due to teething because they wash out of a baby’s mouth within minutes. What’s more, they can be dangerous.
The use of benzocaine gels, sprays, ointments, solutions, and lozenges for mouth and gum pain can lead to a serious—and sometimes fatal—condition called methemoglobinemia, in which the oxygen-carrying capacity of red blood cells is greatly reduced. 
That’s why the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) is warning parents & caregivers that benzocaine products should not be used to treat teething pain in infants or children.
What You Can Do for Teething Children
On average, children begin teething around 4 to 7 months, & have a total of 20 “baby teeth” by age 3. 
According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), occasional symptoms of teething include mild irritability, a low-level fever, drooling, & an urge to chew on something hard.
Because teething happens during a time of much change in a baby’s life, it is often wrongly blamed for congestion, coughing, vomiting, diarrhea, & sleep disturbances.
If your child’s gums are swollen & tender:
gently rub or massage the gums with your finger
give your child a teething ring made of firm rubber…

Genetics Home Reference: spinal muscular atrophy with lower extremity predominance

Harms MB, Ori-McKenney KM, Scoto M, Tuck EP, Bell S, Ma D, Masi S, Allred P, Al-Lozi M, Reilly MM, Miller LJ, Jani-Acsadi A, Pestronk A, Shy ME, Muntoni F, Vallee RB, Baloh RH. Mutations in the tail domain of DYNC1H1 cause dominant spinal muscular atrophy. Neurology. 2012 May 29;78(22):1714-20. doi: 10.1212/WNL.0b013e3182556c05. Epub 2012 Mar 28.
Martinez-Carrera LA, Wirth B. Dominant spinal muscular atrophy is caused by mutations in BICD2, an important golgin protein. Front Neurosci. 2015 Nov 5;9:401. doi: 10.3389/fnins.2015.00401. eCollection 2015. Review.

Neveling K, Martinez-Carrera LA, Hölker I will, Heister A, Verrips A, Hosseini-Barkooie SM, Gilissen C, Vermeer S, Pennings M, Meijer R, te Riele M, Frijns CJ, Suchowersky O, MacLaren L, Rudnik-Schöneborn S, Sinke RJ, Zerres K, Lowry RB, Lemmink HH, Garbes L, Veltman JA, Schelhaas HJ, Scheffer H, Wirth B. Mutations in BICD2, which encodes a golgin & important motor adaptor, cause congenital autosomal-dominant spinal muscular atrophy. Am J Hum Genet. 2013 Jun 6;92(6):946-54. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2013.04.011. Epub 2013 May 9.

Rossor AM, Oates EC, Salter HK, Liu Y, Murphy SM, Schule R, Gonzalez MA, Scoto M, Phadke R, Sewry CA, Houlden H, Jordanova A, Tournev I'm am, Chamova T, Litvinenko I will am, Zuchner S, Herrmann DN, Blake J, Sowden JE, Acsadi G, Rodriguez ML, Menezes MP, Clarke NF, Auer Grumbach M, Bullock SL, Muntoni F, Reilly MM, North KN. Phenotypic & molecular insights into spinal muscular atrophy due to mutations in BICD2. Brain. 2015 Feb;138(Pt 2):293-310. doi: 10.1093/brain/awu356. Epub 2014 Dec 14.

Scoto M, Rossor AM, Harms…

Age-Related Racial Disparity in Suicide Rates Among U.S. Youth

News Release
Monday, May 21, 2018 NIH-funded study suggests need for more research into contributing factors; targeted interventions for children. New research suggests the suicide rate is roughly two times higher for black children ages 5-12 compared with white children of the same age group. The study, funded by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), appears online May 21 in JAMA Pediatrics.
Suicide is a major public health problem & a leading cause of death in the United States. While suicide among young children is quite rare, it can be devastating to families, friends, & communities. Past patterns of national youth suicide rates revealed higher rates for white compared to black youth.
Jeffrey Bridge, Ph.D., of the Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, Lisa Horowitz, Ph.D., of the NIMH Intramural Research Program, and coauthors set out to investigate race-related differences in suicide rates in youth overall. Using data from the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention’s Web-based Injury Statistics Query & Reporting System (WISQARS), which provides fatal & nonfatal injury, violent death, and cost-of-injury data, the team of researchers analyzed the data from 2001-2015 separately for children ages 5-12 & adolescents ages 13-17.
The findings suggest the suicide rate is roughly two times higher for black children compared with white children of the same age group. These results were observed in both males & females. In contrast, the rate of suicide for black adolescents was half that of white adolescents; these results held when the data were analyzed by sex.
“While the…

Women with Pregnancy-Related Diabetes May be at Risk for Chronic Kidney Disease

News Release
Monday, May 21, 2018 Gestational diabetes may predispose women to early-stage kidney damage, a precursor to chronic kidney disease, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions. The study appears in Diabetes Care.
Gestational diabetes occurs only in pregnancy & results when the level of blood sugar is too high. The condition increases the risk for preterm birth & cesarean delivery, among other complications. Other forms of diabetes that occur outside of pregnancy are known to increase the risk for chronic kidney disease, in which the kidneys have difficulty filtering wastes from the blood. Few studies have investigated the potential link between gestational diabetes & chronic kidney disease.
“Our findings suggest that women who have had gestational diabetes may benefit from periodic checkups to detect early-stage kidney damage & receive subsequent treatment,” said the study’s Elder author, Cuilin Zhang, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D., of the Epidemiology Branch at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD).
The researchers found that women who had gestational diabetes were more likely to have a high glomerular filtration rate (GFR), an estimate of how much blood per minute passes through the glomeruli, the tiny filters within kidneys that extract waste from the blood. Many researchers think that a very high GFR can precede the early kidney damage that accompanies pre-diabetes — higher than normal blood sugar levels that are not high enough to be classified as diabetes.
The work was conducted as part of the NICHD-funded Diabetes…

Annual Report to the Nation: Overall Cancer Mortality Continues to Decline, Prostate Cancer Mortality Has Stabilized

News Release
Tuesday, May 22, 2018 The latest Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer finds that overall cancer death rates continue to decline in men, women, & children in the United States in all major racial & ethnic groups. Overall cancer incidence, or rates of new cancers, decreased in men & were stable in women from 1999 to 2014. In a companion study, researchers reported that there has been an increase in incidence of late-stage prostate cancer & that after decades of decline, prostate cancer mortality has stabilized.
The annual report is a collaborative effort between the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health; the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); the American Cancer Society; & the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR). The studies appeared online in Cancer on May 22, 2018.
“This year’s report is an encouraging indicator of progress we’re making in cancer research. As overall death rates continue to decline for all major racial and ethnic groups in the United States, it’s clear that interventions are having an impact,” said NCI Director Ned Sharpless, M.D. “The report also highlights areas where more work is needed. With steadfast commitment to patients and their families, we will be able to lower the mortality rates faster & improve the lives of those affected by cancer.”
The report includes mortality data through 2015. It shows that, from 1999 to 2015, overall cancer death rates decreased by 1.8 percent per year among men & by 1.4…

NIH-Funded Researchers Identify Target for Chikungunya Treatment

Media Advisory
Monday, May 21, 2018 What
Scientists have identified a molecule found on human cells & some animal cells that could be a useful target for drugs against chikungunya virus infection & related diseases, according to new research published in the journal Nature. A team led by scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis conducted the research, which was funded in part by the National Institute of Allergy & Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health.
Chikungunya, an alphavirus, is transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected mosquito. Currently no specific treatment is available for chikungunya virus infection, which can cause fever and debilitating joint pain & arthritis. Small, sporadic outbreaks of chikungunya occurred in Africa, Asia, Europe, & the Indian & Pacific Oceans after the virus was identified in the 1950s. In 2013, the virus spread to the Americas & has since caused a widespread and ongoing epidemic.
In this study, scientists aimed to better understand which traits make humans susceptible to chikungunya virus infection. Using the gene-editing tool CRISPR-Cas9, they performed a genome-wide screen that identified the molecule Mxra8 as a key to the entry of chikungunya virus and related viruses into host cells. In the laboratory, scientists were able to reduce the ability of chikungunya virus to infect cells by editing the human and mouse genes that encode Mxra8. The researchers also administered anti-Mxra8 antibodies to mice & infected the mice with chikungunya virus or O’nyong-nyong virus, another alphavirus. The antibody-treated mice…

5 Tips for a Healthy Vacation

To help protect your skin & eyes while outside, wear sunglasses, a hat, & broad spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher.

 Subscribe: FDA Consumer Health Information
Español
Planning your next beach vacation? While having fun in the sun, consider these five tips to make sure your trip is a healthy one.
Avoid Tanning, Be Sun Safe
Thinking about getting a “healthy tan” over vacation? Think again. When you’re exposed to sunlight, an increase in your skin pigment (called “melanin”) can be a sign of damage. Ultraviolet radiation from the sun can cause wrinkles & dark spots among other problems—and tanning puts you at higher risk for skin cancer. Plus, sunlight reflecting off of sand or water increases exposure to UV radiation & increases your risk of developing eye problems.
But sunny days can still figure into your trip. Here’s how to be sun safe.
Use sunscreen. Wear a broad spectrum sunscreen that protects against UVA & UVB rays, & choose an SPF of 15 or higher. You need at least one ounce of sunscreen lotion (the size of a golf ball) to cover your body. Reapply at least every 2 hours, or every 40 to 80 minutes when swimming or sweating, according to the directions on the product label. And limit the time your skin is exposed to the sun between 10 a.m. & 2 p.m.
Wear sunglasses. Certain sunglasses can help protect your eyes. Choose sunglasses labeled with a UVA/UVB rating of 100% to get the most UV protection.
Wear protective clothing. Consider wearing…

International Study Suggests Combination Therapy May Prevent Stroke in Certain People

News Release
Thursday, May 17, 2018 NIH-funded trial finds lower rate of secondary stroke but small risk of bleeding. Results from an international clinical trial of more than 4880 participants, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, show that combining clopidogrel and aspirin following a small stroke or experiencing minor stroke symptoms decreases risk of a new stroke, heart attack or other ischemic event within 90 days.  The combination therapy was also associated with an increase in major bleeding, although many of those episodes were non-fatal & did not occur in the brain. The results were presented at the 4th European Stroke Organization Conference in Gothenburg, Sweden. The study was supported by the NIH’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS).
“These findings are likely to have a global effect on clinical practice, as these drugs are easily available in many hospitals & clinics,” said Walter Koroshetz, M.D., director of NINDS. “As the benefit of the combination was concentrated in the first two weeks while risk of bleeding was constant over 90 days, it may be especially valuable in acute management of a minor ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA).”
The Platelet-Oriented Inhibition in New TIA & minor ischemic stroke (POINT) clinical trial follows an earlier study, which showed benefits of this drug combination in a Chinese population. POINT was conducted to see whether the benefits could be expanded to a more diverse group of patients.
The study, led by S. Claiborne Johnston, M.D., Ph.D., dean and professor of neurology at…

Male Depression May Lower Pregnancy Chances Among Infertile Couples, NIH Study Suggests

News Release
Thursday, May 17, 2018 Study also links women’s use of non-SSRI antidepressants to early pregnancy loss. Among couples being treated for infertility, depression in the male partner was linked to lower pregnancy chances, while depression in the female partner was not found to influence the rate of live birth, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health.
The study, which appears in Fertility & Sterility, also linked a class of antidepressants known as non-selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (non-SSRIs) to a higher risk of early pregnancy loss among females being treated for infertility. SSRIs, another class of antidepressants, were not linked to pregnancy loss. Neither depression in the female partner nor use of any other class of antidepressant were linked to lower pregnancy rates.
“Our study provides infertility patients & their physicians with new information to consider when making treatment decisions,” said study author Esther Eisenberg, M.D., of the Fertility & Infertility Branch at NIH’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD), which funded the study.
Citing previous studies, the authors noted that 41 percent of women seeking fertility treatments have symptoms of depression. In addition, a study of men seeking IVF treatments found that nearly 50 percent experienced depression. The authors conducted the current study to evaluate the potential influence of depression in couples seeking non-IVF treatments.
The researchers combined data from two previous studies funded by NICHD’s Reproductive Medicine Network. One study compared the effectiveness of two ovulation-inducing drugs for establishment of pregnancy &…

FDA Approves First Medication to Reduce Opioid Withdrawal Symptoms

Courtesy of US WorldMeds, LLC.
The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health, is pleased to announce that lofexidine, the first medication for use in reducing symptoms associated with opioid withdrawal in adults, has been approved by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration. Lofexidine, an oral tablet, is designed to manage the symptoms patients often experience during opioid discontinuation. Opioid withdrawal symptoms, which can begin as early as a few hours after the drug was last taken, may include aches & pains, muscle spasms/twitching, stomach cramps, muscular tension, heart pounding, insomnia/problems sleeping, feelings of coldness, runny eyes, yawning, & feeling sick, among others. The product will be marketed under the brand name LUCEMYRATM.
In 2016, more than 42,000 people died from an opioid overdose, or approximately 115 people per day. Although effective treatments exist for opioid addiction, painful & difficult withdrawal is one of the reasons treatment fails, and relapse occurs. By alleviating symptoms associated with opioid withdrawal, LUCEMYRA could help patients complete their discontinuation of opioids & facilitate successful treatment. To date, no other medications have been approved to treat opioid withdrawal symptoms.
LUCEMYRA will be marketed by US WorldMeds, a specialty pharmaceutical company that acquired a license for lofexidine from Britannia Pharmaceuticals in 2003. NIDA provided funding to US WorldMeds to support clinical trials to document the clinical pharmacokinetics of lofexidine & to test medical safety & efficacy of the medication, as compared to a placebo, among patients undergoing medically supervised opioid discontinuation. LUCEMYRA is expected to be…

Heathy Casa © 2018 Frontier Theme
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!